Jim Wilson is The Treasure Coast’s Johnny Appleseed

An illustration in The Saturday Evening Post showing American folk hero Johnny Appleseed is part of the collection at the Johnny Appleseed Educational Center and Museum at Urbana University in Ubana, Ohio on Friday, July 18, 2014. An anonymous donation is allowing the museum to create a traveling exhibit to clear up misconceptions and tell the story of the man behind the legend. (AP Photo/Mike Munden)

An illustration in The Saturday Evening Post showing American folk hero Johnny Appleseed is part of the collection at the Johnny Appleseed Educational Center and Museum at Urbana University in Ubana, Ohio on Friday, July 18, 2014. An anonymous donation is allowing the museum to create a traveling exhibit to clear up misconceptions and tell the story of the man behind the legend. (AP Photo/Mike Munden)

ALTHOUGH JIM WILSON DOES NOT WEAR A COOKING POT AS A HAT, WEAR A COFFEE SACK WITH HOLES FOR HIS ARMS AND LEGS, OR GOES BEAR FOOT YEAR-ROUND EVEN IN ICE AND SNOW, local resident Jim Wilson is the Johnny Appleseed of The Treasure Coast.

That’s because he plants seeds. But his seeds are not apple seeds; they consist of inspiration and motivational introspection on the beauty of The Treasure Coast and to try to “instill a sense of our place for locals and newcomers by inspiring people to look at the beauty we have here.”

“As I go places I plant seeds.”

Jim Wilson

Jim Wilson

A recognized photographer and social media professional, Jim brings the beauty of The Treasure Coast through these channels.  “Our beauty is amazing if you go out and look for it.”  That’s how Jim does it.  He goes out and looks for it and then shares it on the multitude of groups he has created on Facebook.

“Each sunrise is a gift.  Every sunrise is different.  Some have light beams as far as you can see.  The landscapes are a treasure to behold.”

Sunrise 2

“To get a sense of the place you first have to learn its history.  Then you have to see all its beauty and all its treasures, then you will fall in love with it and want to cherish it and protect it.”  Jim Wilson

Sunrise

Sunrise Light Beams

sunrise 3

Pinks, Oranges and Reds

Sunrise 4

“Every sunrise is different”

Jim says our sunsets are just as much of a treasure as our sunrises. “In particular, when there are Epic sandstorms, which bring in Saharan dust. The dust enhances sunsets and brings out more beauty by creating oranges, reds and pinks.”

Refer to this link for an article on Sahraran dust:

Saharan Dust Headed For South Florida Friday

To share this beauty Jim creates Facebook groups.  When we asked how many he had he said: “I knew you were going to ask that. I’ve lost count. I use social media to share our beauty and bring back our history.”

Three of his favorite Facebook groups are “Growing Up in Vero,” with 6,200 members, “Treasure Coast Views,” with 2479 members and a relatively new group, “1715 Treasure Coast” with 276 members.

The “1715 Treasure Coast” group was set-up to help inform the uninformed about the history the 1715 Spanish Treasure Fleet that allowed the Treasure Coast to be named Treasure Coast.  In a future article we will provide you with this history, as researched by Mr. Wilson.

Jim’s newest group is “History of the Ais Indians of the Indian River Lagoon Uncovered,” which he created to provide a meeting place to have discussions about ways each community within what was once known as ” The Land of the Ais ” ( This includes Martin , Saint Lucie, Indian River and Brevard Counties) can do or have done to honor and memorialize the Ais people.

For a related article on Ais Indians please access this link:

https://verocommunique.com/2015/10/29/finding-an-arrow-and-axe-head-led-jim-wilson-on-a-hunt-to-discover-the-history-of-the-treasure-coasts-ais-indians/

According to Wikipedia, “The Ais, or Ays were a tribe of Native Americans who inhabited the Atlantic Coast of Florida. They ranged from present-day Cape Canaveral to the St. Lucie Inlet,in the present-day counties of Brevard, Indian River, St. Lucie and northernmost Martin. They lived in villages and towns along the shores of the great lagoon called Rio de Ais by the Spanish, and now called the Indian River. The name “Ais” is derived from a great Indian cacique (chief).”

Please refer to our related article on the Ais Indians.

Jim’s Facebook groups are just that; they are groups that allow interaction amongst it’s members, rather than just being a page.  Members post their own photos and communicate with each other.  In the “Growing Up In Vero Beach” group, one member posted a photograph of his father’s fire helmet when he retired as a Captain in 1981.

The group also allows members to share old memories.

He says: “I have so many things in my head. Whenever I get an idea I can create a Facebook group in less than five minutes.  Then through social media I’ll have 50 members.  So it takes me less that 15 minutes to create a group.”

Jim doesn’t like the limelight and his work is basically a serious hobby.  He grew up on The Treasure Coast; his grandfather having relocated here in 1915.

He has recently been appointed to the Board of Directors of the Vero Beach Historical Society.  “That is such an honor for me.  I plan to bring my social media skills to the Society to promote our history.”

What Jim doesn’t know about the Treasure Coast, he will.  Did you know the manager of the Ocean Grille was the original child on the Campbell Soup cans?

Ocean Grill

Jim says “The Treasure Coast is like an onion, where you keep peeling back its layers.”

3 thoughts on “Jim Wilson is The Treasure Coast’s Johnny Appleseed

  1. Pingback: Finding an Arrow and Axe Head Led Jim Wilson on a Hunt to Discover the History of The Treasure Coast’s Ais Indians | Vero Communiqué

  2. Pingback: Does this Gentleman Look Like Vero Beach City Councilman Randy Old? | Vero Communiqué

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